The Disparity in Windscreen Claims

When your insurer denies your request for a genuine ‘OE’ windscreen replacement, and insists that you might have to pay the difference between what they are prepared to pay for and what you want, ask them why they appear to be okay about paying for dealer parts if the car is in for accident repairs.

An example:

A chap had his windscreen replaced after it cracked. He followed his insurer’s instructions and their nominated repairer arrived to fulfill their obligation. The car is registered 2017, so fairly new and very much under warranty. The make and model is irrelevant; academic, as a claim is a claim regardless of the cost. This is the windscreen they fitted:

Aftermarket 'copy' windscreen
Aftermarket ‘pattern parts’ Windscreen

As you can see, it’s a Shatterprufe windscreen (a South African company) which is merely a copy of the original (and not manufactured in accordance with the blueprint which the car manufacturer owns). It is much cheaper than the original (a fraction of it, in fact) and it allows the nominated repairer to service their agreement by volume of work on the basis of exclusivity. The process, from the car owner’s point of view, was easy and as straight forward as he could hope for; he paid his excess and everyone lived happily ever after.

Some time after the event, the same chap in the same car had an episode with another driver on the road, and the car had to be taken into a crash repair centre. Just like when his windscreen was replaced, he was instructed to take the car to his insurance company’s nominated repairer. Again, all fairly easy and the car was returned to him after the repair work was completed. There was however, something a bit different in this process. All replacement parts were original equipment, i.e., genuine ‘main dealer’ parts. They were the same as what the car manufacturer used when the car was assembled. One of those replacement parts was the windscreen. This is what the same insurance company agreed to pay for and authorised the fitting of:

Original Equipment

Glass cover and accident insurance are two components of the same indemnity, so why the disparity? Why apply dissimilar conditions to the same product which results in the use of premium products in one scenario and cheaper, inferior products in the other?

This is a stranglehold you are placed in by your insurer who do not make this clear before policy inception. Try removing glass cover from the proposal: “the computer says no”. Try to ascertain what will happen in the event of a claim scenario and it’s not really that clear. In fact, it’s confusing but you have to find where it states what the outcome would be in the event of a claim, and when you do – if you do – it’s difficult to understand.

The aim of Insurance Conduct of Business Sourcebook (ICOBS) is to ensure that customers are treated fairly. One section in particular is not being observed properly:

“A firm must take reasonable steps to ensure a customer is given appropriate information about a policy in good time and in a comprehensible form so that the customer can make an informed decision about the arrangements proposed”.

In failing to define the outcome of initiating a claim by not stating that they will steer policyholders into using their nominated repairer (who in turn will use cheap and inferior parts) they are not presenting an important fact – or salient point – of the proposal. This should take place before policy inception, or, before you click on the ‘I accept the terms and conditions’ button. Conversely, the ‘proceed to payment’ button is harder to miss.

Funny that.





It’s Just a Windscreen

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Whilst shaving the excess cured resin during this repair, the solar reflective coating became visible under the light in the workshop.

Layers of Reflection 3
Holograms

This particular windscreen is heated (embedded within the sandwich construction of the windscreen is a mesh of very thin heating wires which you will see in the image if you look closely; another more modern version of this is heated chemically via a silver/zinc oxide coated film within the glass).

Also within this windscreen’s layers is a ‘solar reflective’ coating (also known as solar reflective or athermic). Solar glass will allow sunlight to pass through it while radiating and reflecting away a large degree of the sun’s heat. This windscreen is also a HUD variant meaning it has a ‘wedge piece’ integrated within the PVB interlayer, This effectively is the surface onto which the image is projected. It also negates the ghosting effect you get on normal glass.


The Weather WILL NOT crack your windscreen.

The cold weather will not crack your windscreen.

That chip you’ve had there for weeks or even months will not ‘turn into a crack’ because it’s cold outside. Fast forward to the summer and the same windscreen repair ‘experts’ will be urging you to ‘get that chip repaired’ because of the hot weather.

We may conclude from this that there is never a good time to have a chipped windscreen. In essence, this is correct however try telling that to the chap who has had a chip on his windscreen for three years (he doesn’t really care too much about the scaremongering because his car has passed its MOT three times since the chip appeared and it’s not in the wiper sweep zone).

Making one small change can potentially help towards preventing your windscreen from cracking.

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Windscreen Defrost Switch Symbol

Once your windscreen has cleared of condensation – or ice – channel the heat away from the windscreen (but keep the cabin warm). It’s not quite as simple, but essentially this is the basis: do not overheat your windscreen.

Thermal expansion.

Direct heat to the inside of the glass will cause the inner layer to expand. While this is going on, the vinyl inter-layer will also soften. Meanwhile, the outer layer (the one with the chip on it) is exposed to a much colder temperature; the heat and movement behind it (plus the torsional forces working through the car’s chassis) could cause the chip to crack. Once the crack extends, it will continue to move until it (eventually) reaches an edge on the windscreen. The same principle works in the summer when you have a much cooler temperature inside the cabin and heat outside the car.

Demist the Windscreen FULLY.

Redirect the blowers AWAY from the windscreen. It’s easy to forget the heater is on and channeling most of the generated heat to the windscreen. In the summer months, leaving the A/C on is great to keep the car cool but be mindful that the windscreen demist/defog is not directing all the cool air directly to the windscreen.

This is not an exact science as there are variables in the type of chip; its position on the windscreen; ambient temperature; temperature changes; the speed of temperature change; terrain (upon which the car is driven) and possibly even style of driving.

A Motor Insurance Rant

Not all insurance companies are bad, but the ones I have dealt with recently represent the industry.

I’ve insured my van with the same insurer (broker and underwriter) for the last four years. No claims, no convictions and not even an enquiry which could be classed as an unclaimed loss, yet the premium went from £580 (approx) in year one, to £660 in YR2; £820 in YR3 and year four made me a £999.00 fool for being a loyal customer. I’ve been struggling with my finances so I decided to try the eis scheme. This year they wanted more or less the same so I had a moan about the whole thing whilst reminding them that the SAME vehicle is now worth considerably less now than when they first insured it.

At first I got the expected, ‘insurance premium tax’ patter. I resisted and was subsequently offered the ‘fraudulent claims’ explanation; the chap – Iain – concurred that us honest types are getting shafted for the pleasure. Furthermore, insurance companies shafting each other when they can made for quite a depressing conversation which ended with me giving my now former insurer the elbow as I head for all that I could find on the internet. I found a few attractive quotes; the best one was less than half of what I was paying (or was invited to pay if I remained a loyal customer).

I opted to go with the cheapest option simply because I was familiar with the underwriter having had direct experience with them dealing with windscreen claims for customers, and also the issuing broker is well known in motoring circles. However, as I navigated my way through the questions I gathered a few of my own along the way:

1. The proposal included a replacement vehicle in the event of being without mine while it was being repaired. But when I got to the checkout stage to pay, a list of bolt-ons appeared on the same page, such as: cover for tools; breakdown recovery; key care; mis-fuel cover and… replacement vehicle cover. I clicked on the ‘more’ link and this additional product offered exactly what the policy included as standard. How many people would have clicked on this and “for just an additional £17.00” added the extra cover which is included in the proposal?

2. Throughout the whole proposal stage, I couldn’t find anything which told me more about the policy itself. In fact, I had to go through quite a bit of jargon to (eventually) find who the underwriter was in this instance. There was, however, no mention of who the approved repairer(s) was/were; no mention of what would happen in the event of a windscreen claim other than the words: you are covered (the point being, if there are restrictions on what parts will be used; who you can – or cannot – use to have them fitted or if there was a capping on the settlement if I basically didn’t adhere to the agreement (which I was struggling to understand).

3. After (reluctantly) accepting the terms I was sent a confirmation of policy inception. However no documents could be sent until a couple of points had been verified. The first was my occupation. I selected ‘windscreen fitter’ from the available categories and stated that I am employed by a company which I am also Director of. 24 hours into this new cover, a conversation with the insurance representative took place so that she could clear up some confusion over this. The other was that she had the vehicle down as a 4Motion. There may be a (very slim) chance that I entered this information incorrectly but I am 99.9% certain I didn’t (it was indexed from the VRN as a Highline T5 so flux knows where they got the 4 Motion bit from). The result of this meant that because of “these ammendments to the policy” there is a supplement to pay. A demand for and additional £46.00 is to be paid in the next SEVEN DAYS if cover is to continue.

4. A question of an old SP30 came up (out of nowhere as I didn’t mention it at any stage; a spent conviction dated 2012) and I said it shouldn’t be considered. She said they will take my word for it. The issue here is, if there is a doubt now, it might be a factor in the event of a claim, so if we are about to enter into an agreement why not put it beyond doubt? Hire companies do it before you rent a car from them (chuck ’em you NI number and they’ll run a check) so why be so flippant about it? Yes, the onus is on me to disclose but I didn’t mention it anywhere at any stage (on the basis that I am not required to after seven years although I’m sure it is ‘spent’ after four/five).

Half of me says I got a good quote to begin with so just let them have the 46-quid. The other half is saying no, b*ll*cks.

How the flux can tweaking my occupation AND/OR confirming the van as a slightly lesser spec than they thought initially result in a higher premium?

What’s tipped me over the edge with all this is that I received not one but TWO calls about the SAME proposal 12 hours into the cover stating that I had qualified for an INTRODUCTORY DISCOUNT if I gave them the business.

Will someone get hold of the insurance industry and give it a good shake, please?

Ta.

Removing a Windscreen Intact and Without Damage

 

 

Windscreens don’t break. Fitters break them.

Time and time again the caveat or disclaimer is added to a windscreen-needs-to-be-removed scenario is that it ‘might break’ on removal. Some will even go as far as saying that it actually will break when you try to remove it from the car. Bollocks.

These are the same people who jump onto a social media platform and bang their drum to celebrate their triumph as if they even surprised themselves: “Removed this windscreen INTACT”. What do they want, a medal for doing what windscreen fitters should be doing with their eyes shut?

Of course there is a risk of breakage – it’s glass, and we’re all not infallible – but it’s rare; less than 1%. With the benefit of experience most trained eyes will be able to identify a danger area where they might be faced with a tight spot, but then that same experience will guide them through it, under or around the problem.

 

Experience is knowing the pitfalls of your trade and more importantly, how to get around them.

 

The next time the person or company you’re trying to engage to remove a windscreen tries to wash their hands of any blame, ask them to explain how or why windscreens break on removal.

Aluminum Windscreens

 

 

 

Aluminum windscreens. Yes, you read that correctly, ‘But aluminum is a metal, and a windscreen is made of glass?’ I hear you ask.

To help make this information easier to process, aluminum glass is actually, technically, transparent aluminum. A sample of transparent aluminum say, a tube, looks like a tube made of glass but it’s actually aluminum. Well, an asterisked aluminum; this is not elemental aluminum but rather a material made from it as the core ingredient.

Transparent Aluminum tube

Despite clearly not being a metal (and not a glass either; glasses are amorphous solids while ceramics are crystalline) transparent ceramics demonstrate impressive properties. Transparent aluminum is produced by a process called sintering. Powdered ingredients are poured into a mould, compacted under tremendous pressure, and cooked at high temperatures over long periods. The resulting translucent material is then ground and polished to transparency ready for use.

Aluminium Oxynitride ( “ALON” ) is a ceramic composed of aluminium, oxygen and nitrogen. .

Aside from being optically transparent (≥80%) in the near-ultraviolet, visible and midwave-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, ALON is four times harder than fused silica glass; 85% as hard as sapphire, and nearly 15% harder than magnesium aluminate spinel. Since it has a cubic spinel structure, it can be fabricated to produce transparent windows, plates, domes, rods, tubes and other forms using conventional ceramic powder processing techniques. Tests show that a laminated pane of ALON 1.6″ thick can stop a 50 caliber rifle round, something even 3.7″ of traditional “bullet-proof” glass can’t do. ALON also has better optical properties than regular glass in the infrared wavelengths; where most glasses absorb IR, ALON is essentially transparent to it. That makes ALON a great choice for the windows on heat seeking missiles and other IR applications.

ALON also demonstrates superior scratch resistance.

SHUT UP and TAKE MY MONEY!

While the technology exists, there is currently no demand for automotive windscreens. Unbreakable and damage-resistant glass is undoubtedly a game-changer which could spell trouble for many AGRR businesses. However, in applications such as mobile phones, the increased demand for such a material will drive costs down, but windscreens might take a while longer.

An ‘aluminum windscreen’ presently could cost in the region of £30,000-40,000, a price tag which even Monty Brewster might balk at.

 

 

Audi A3 Windscreen Replacement

An Audi A3 windscreen replacement. This particular car was an RS3 (in Catalunya Red).

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Audi RS3 Windscreen Replacement

A-pillar covers. I like to take them off. It reduces the risk of damage, and with them out of the way you can check that the bond is making good contact on both the glass as well as the body. There’s a screw at the top of the cover, but before you go yanking on the moulded plastic, you need to free the bottom; and there’s a bit of trim which needs to be separated from the bottom of the A-pillar cover. In order to do this, there is a cover on each side of the dashboard. These must be removed.

Thankfully this was all cover by the insurance company because the accident was recorded with the Blackbox My Car camera. The best product to have in your car  with the best technology system.

The designers have been very helpful by providing a notch towards the bottom of the curved edge which allows you to slip the tip of a trim tool in as you start to ‘pop’ the covers off.

Removing A-Pillar Trim

Removing A-Pillar Trim

The trim can now be removed.

Screw Behind Airbag Cover

There’s a tweeter to disconnect from the cover too:

Tweeter

With the pillar covers removed, the next step is to remove the rear view mirror and the light (and rain) sensor behind it. The sensor is clipped in with a spring-loaded clasp. With the two sides of it released, the sensor will need to be eased out of the mounting bracket very carefully as it will be stuck to the glass with a sticky gel pad. Care must be taken not to go in from the bottom of the sensor as this is where the de-fogging sensor is hiding.

Removal of Rain Sensor

With the interior parts removed, the wipers and wiper cowl can also be removed. There are also two trims – one either side of the windscreen – which must also be removed in order to expose the windscreen edge.

The windscreen can now be released using a cut-out method. Whichever method is used, the emphasis should be on not to damage the paintwork. Here, a cutting wire is being fed into the car via a wire feeder tube. The tube pierces through the adhesive to allow the wire to pass through; a metal guard is positioned so that the act of passing the feeder through does not scratch the paintwork.

Wire Feeder

The windscreen is removed and old adhesive cut back taking care not to damage the paintwork. After cleaning and inspecting the bond line, the surface must be prepared in accordance with the polyurethane adhesive manufacturer’s guidelines.

Once the new windscreen is prepared for bonding, it’s a good time to reattach the rain sensor. A new gel pad is needed for this.

New Gel Pad on Rain Sensor

Steps must be taken not to trap any air anywhere when sandwiching the gel pad between sensor and glass.

Gel Pad Fitted

The new windscreen can now be fitted to the car. I like to date the inside of the glass and provide product details for the adhesive used. The installer’s name and a code for whom it was fitted may prove useful should there be any issues after fitting.

 

Traceability

Glue on glass or body: opinion is divided. I’m an advocate of applying the adhesive on the glass. You get to discharge the product in one go which means one start/stop point (therefore one join) and the glue gun can be held perpendicular to the glass during extrusion in order to minimise the risk of an effect called tunneling in the glue.

Urethane on Windscreen

The windscreen should be bedded down sufficiently so that when the side trims are refitted, there is no gap between the trim and the glass. If the adhesive is compressed to much gaps can show as the trims are held in on a fixed metal track which does not allow adjustment.

Trims

Audi RS3 windscreen replacement: done.

Comments and questions welcomed.

 

Dealer Approved Car? Check the Windscreen

 

 

Something to consider when buying a dealer-approved, used car.

A returning customer got in touch after he bought an ‘approved’ car from a main dealer. He wanted the non-standard windscreen removed and replaced with a genuine ‘OE’ part. As an engineer, he’s fastidious about most things in his life, especially when it comes to cars; for example his garage wasn’t designed to house his previous car (an Audi S8) so he measured the floor-space and calculated that the car would fit but, it would need to be millimeter perfect if he wanted to a) get of the car after parking it, and b) close the (electric) up-and-over door behind it. In order to achieve this – right first time, every time – he articulated a laser guidance system. It was setup to allow a tolerance of +/- 5mm on one side and 20mm at the front. Aligning witness marks on the driveway, bonnet and door mirrors against the red laser lines as he entered the garage served as checkpoints ensuring he was within tolerances. No tennis-ball-on-a-string for this chap!

Our friend’s keenness to demonstrate how precise his system was sets the tone for why he wanted his new car to be perfect. I watched him approach the garage opening, and the theme for Mission Impossible began to play in my head as he guided the car through an intricacy of omnidirectional lines. The parking was absolute and true to his blueprint. To measure the gap between the nearside door handle and the wall you probably would need a feeler gauge (which no doubt wouldn’t have been far from his digital vernier caliper). Excessive? Perhaps. But his commitment to the cause was wholly admirable. It can also serve as one of the best appraisals of your work when such a customer gives you their approval.

As I noted his latest instructions we discussed the age of the car, “2017” he stated. The mileage – as ultra low as it was – was irrelevant; this car would still be covered by a manufacturer warranty. With this in mind, I suggested that he speak to the seller about what the outcome would be if there was an issue with the windscreen, or an electronic device connected to it such as the rain sensor or Lane Departure Warning camera. In the event of a (device) malfunction, or issue with the windscreen and/or installation, the manufacturer warranty would not entertain any claim if there is a non-genuine part fitted. The workshop will just kick it out, or at least until the ‘fake’ part was replaced with a genuine one.

There was no resistance from the selling dealership as he negotiated the cost of an Original Equipment replacement from them, and a contribution towards having an approved installer fit it. Moving forward, the car now is 100% genuine, with authentic parts throughout, and will now accord with the warranty criteria.

 

 

 

993 Windscreen Creak Down Under

 

 

 

A very common 993 windscreen issue as illustrated by a frustrated owner via email:

“I was hoping you might be able to help me out when I finish sleeping with my snoogle pregnancy pillow, I am in Australia at the moment and just had a new original front window installed in my Porsche 993 (the windscreen was an insurance claim and the car was being repainted at the same time so no issue with the surface as it was all freshly painted and all new seals etc and original Porsche parts).”

A freshly painted 993 and a new windscreen. Sounds like a good start, however…

“The window creaks (both at highway speed and at lower speeds around town). I supplied the Porsche tape with the car and the guys installing tell me they had done plenty of 993s without problem. Since the window was installed and creaks started they tell me they did not use the tape and mine is the first window they have ever had problems with. They are telling me to live with it at this stage which naturally I am not overly pleased with.”

The installer’s  defence of the ‘first window they have ever had problems with’ is quite ambiguous; it could mean:

  1. they have been getting away with it thus far;
  2. none of their previous customers kept the car for any period after the windscreen was replaced, therefore, a new owner somewhere else inherited the problem with the purchase;
  3. the previous 993 windscreen installs were better than this one. The fact that they say this car is the first one they’ve had problems with is pretty much an admission that they have encountered (or are about to encounter) an undeniable problem with the job;
  4. or that the car owner is being overly fussy about something that they don’t identify as a problem, they just prefer to sleep with the fluffy pillows.

“They tell me if they reinstall it there is a high likelihood that they will damage the antenna ribbon and then another new windscreen will be required.”

This. Is. A. Fallacy. An utterly mistaken belief, based on an unsound claim. The same can be said about most ‘the glass might break on removal’ caveats. The point in question here is that it is a customer complaint. If the ribbon (cable) is damaged, it is entirely at the installer’s risk: you damage it – you replace it; it’s your problem to fix. Furthermore, this ‘the glass might break on removal’ is a cop-out. If the glass breaks it’s because you broke it, is it not? A good installer will identify a problem before it arises. Yes, there is a realistic chance that it could break but when with the benefit of experience, skill along with the virtue of patience, the failure rate is less than 1%. If the ribbon cable (or antenna which, on the 993, is embedded in the glass and threaded through into the cabin behind the clock) was a casualty the last time you attempted to remove the windscreen, hmm, here’s a thought: try doing it a different way? Experience is knowing the pitfalls of your trade and more importantly, how to avoid them.

“I read your blog again but still had a few questions…”

Time for some concise answers…

“If the window is creaking it is moving and the issue needs to be fixed ?”

Correct. It hasn’t been fitted correctly and needs to be remedied.

“Should the tape be used ?”

No. Nein. Nie.

The VIN number is slightly obscured by the window (to be fair you could not see it at all with the last window so it is better but I read somewhere this is an indication that the install alignment is not good enough) ?

Yes. Sometimes the plate can be misalligned, and the silkprint can also be out on the glass. The combination of the two can obscure some of the VIN (horizontally). There is some scope to adjust by a few milimeters (more vertically) but in any case, all of this can be seen before bonding the windscreen in. Dry fit it. Test fit it. Simples.

ADAS Recalibration After Windscreen Replacement

 

 

 

Have you had your windscreen replaced recently? Is your car equipped with an Advanced Driver-Assistance System? Were you advised (or even warned) about the need to recalibrate that device? Whether your ‘smart’ windscreen has been replaced or not, there is a realistic chance that it might need to be in the future, and this is where you could be faced with more questions… or perhaps not. The subject of recalibrating ADAS devices is a Pandora’s Box full of unsubstantiated claims.

For those new to the technology, some background: ADAS systems are designed and developed to automate and enhance vehicle systems for safer and better driving. These features are designed to help with monitoring, warning, braking, and steering tasks. ADAS relies on inputs from multiple data sources, including automotive imaging, LiDAR, RADAR, image processing and computer vision. These devices are mounted in various places in and around the vehicle; some are mounted behind the windscreen.

ADAS

Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems

Advanced driver-assistance systems are one of the fastest-growing segments in automotive electronics. In terms of car design and evolution, motorists are in safe hands. Ultimately, and until we have autonomous vehicles, the motorist’s hands should however still be on the steering wheel.

Does your camera (or device) need recalibrating after the windscreen has been replaced?

There are a variety of factors to consider, but to cover all bases the blanket response would be to say yes it does. However, before the recalibration apparatus was made available to repair shops, windscreens on cars with ADAS were still being replaced. If the answer is to be yes, why haven’t those vehicles been recalled? The counter argument to that could also be that none of those vehicles needed adjustment, or even, none of them went into default mode after having the windscreen replaced and, worse still, crashed as a result of a misaligned device. There are no reported cases of crashes, injuries or fatalities which were attributed to an uncalibrated camera. Meanwhile, the same cameras are still being recalibrated today.

A motorist emailed me to ask if his device needed calibrating post windscreen replacement. His vehicle featured ‘road sign assist’ which he said he didn’t use anyway. The company who were replacing his windscreen stated that he must drive the car to another one of their sites (30 miles away) to have the camera recalibrated. There was an additional cost implication to this procedure (over £150) as well as his time and fuel to get him there and back. If it was – according the repairer – paramount for his safety why were they sending him on his way, in the compromised car, to another destination 30 miles away? He went ahead and had his windscreen replaced but decided against the recalibration procedure on the basis that he didn’t agree with paying what they were asking for, and then having to embark on a 60-mile round trip in order to get it. Interestingly, he later had his vehicle checked by a manufacturer main agent and there were no flags or faults in the vehicles computer system. Everything worked as it should. The Road Sign Assist device checked out okay.

Traffic Sign Assist

When replacing the windscreen on a vehicle, if the windscreen is a genuine OE product and you are fitting it using the correct bump-stops/trims/damming/mounting components, and within OEM tolerances, as long as you do not disconnect the ADAS device and put the vehicle through an ignition cycle, there is nothing to detect the new part.

Put simply, if you are using manufacturer branded products, fitting them to millimeter precision, and do not put the vehicle through an ignition cycle [with a device disconnected] the car will not know the windscreen has been replaced. It is therefore unlikely that you will encounter any issues. Furthermore, many (if not most) devices are auto-calibrating. They have to be, to allow for constant variables during use. The issues occur mostly (in terms of windscreen replacement) when non-genuine parts are used (referred to as aftermarket parts). Comparing an OE windscreen to an aftermarket copy of it, the differences often become immediately apparent such as misaligned brackets (to which the ADAS device is mounted) or that the material used is inferior. When you mount a camera to its bracket or plate which itself is not positioned correctly, the accuracy of that device is immediately compromised. This therefore, is a scenario where recalibration would be needed. Original parts do not offer any such issues.

The (American-based) Insurance Institute for Highway Safety conducted testing of windscreen-mounted advanced driver assistance systems in 2017 and found that a misaligned camera [on a test vehicle] led to issues with the vehicle’s autobraking and lane-departure warning functions. Honda Collision Marketing Assistant Manager Scott Kaboos summarised after the research that Honda required OEM windscreens be used and that they had seen “many issues” where aftermarket glass led to a situation where the calibration would not “take properly.” After the [repair] shop replaced the windscreen with an OEM edition, “everything worked fine again.” Kaboos stated.

IIHS senior test coordinator Sean O’Malley stated that this demonstrated the need for calibration rather than a ban on aftermarket parts concluding that, “The bottom line is that it could still be calibrated to work as intended.” While a factory-misaligned bracket was found on an aftermarket windscreen, the IIHS found no real issues with aftermarket glass itself, according to O’Malley. Chemical composition, laser refraction and refractive index testing found largely that ‘glass is glass’.

In the UK there have been no reports or stories in the press about firms – nor individuals – being taken to task over negligence. Why? Is it because there have yet not (and thankfully)  been any incidents? Could it also be that there actually isn’t any requirement for an installer to carry out a recalibration? In the same way that any Fred-in-a-shed-with-a-bag-of-tools can replace a windscreen among all the cries of how important structural rigidity is, and how airbags rely on the windscreen to be adequately bonded in order to be effective (provided the occupants are wearing seatbelts in the first instance) anyone can also replace the windscreen on a car equipped with ADAS technology. Is it compulsory to recalibrate those devices? No. Is it necessary to recalibrate them? Maybe.

Whether recalibration is compulsory (after windscreen replacement) or not, are they being checked correctly? Where are the before and after test results? Who is regulating that part of the industry? Who is policing it? How do we know that the procedure was actually carried out? Where is the second printout showing how much adjustment is or was needed? Proof? Is it merely a box-ticking exercise to distance from blame, or something to staple to the invoice to validate the extra charge?

This is a subject that will run for a while, and during that time the ones making the loudest claims in favour of recalibration are also looking for a return on their investment into what is being sold throughout the motor industry as a revenue stream.

Have you had an experience to do with ADAS and windscreen replacement, good, bad or indifferent? Please get in touch.