Dealer Approved Car? Check the Windscreen

 

 

Something to consider when buying a dealer-approved, used car.

A returning customer got in touch after he bought an ‘approved’ car from a main dealer. He wanted the non-standard windscreen removed and replaced with a genuine ‘OE’ part. As an engineer, he’s fastidious about most things in his life, especially when it comes to cars; for example his garage wasn’t designed to house his previous car (an Audi S8) so he measured the floor-space and calculated that the car would fit but, it would need to be millimeter perfect if he wanted to a) get of the car after parking it, and b) close the (electric) up-and-over door behind it. In order to achieve this – right first time, every time – he articulated a laser guidance system. It was setup to allow a tolerance of +/- 5mm on one side and 20mm at the front. Aligning witness marks on the driveway, bonnet and door mirrors against the red laser lines as he entered the garage served as checkpoints ensuring he was within tolerances. No tennis-ball-on-a-string for this chap!

Our friend’s keenness to demonstrate how precise his system was sets the tone for why he wanted his new car to be perfect. I watched him approach the garage opening, and the theme for Mission Impossible began to play in my head as he guided the car through an intricacy of omnidirectional lines. The parking was absolute and true to his blueprint. To measure the gap between the nearside door handle and the wall you probably would need a feeler gauge (which no doubt wouldn’t have been far from his digital vernier caliper). Excessive? Perhaps. But his commitment to the cause was wholly admirable. It can also serve as one of the best appraisals of your work when such a customer gives you their approval.

As I noted his latest instructions we discussed the age of the car, “2017” he stated. The mileage – as ultra low as it was – was irrelevant; this car would still be covered by a manufacturer warranty. With this in mind, I suggested that he speak to the seller about what the outcome would be if there was an issue with the windscreen, or an electronic device connected to it such as the rain sensor or Lane Departure Warning camera. In the event of a (device) malfunction, or issue with the windscreen and/or installation, the manufacturer warranty would not entertain any claim if there is a non-genuine part fitted. The workshop will just kick it out, or at least until the ‘fake’ part was replaced with a genuine one.

There was no resistance from the selling dealership as he negotiated the cost of an Original Equipment replacement from them, and a contribution towards having an approved installer fit it. Moving forward, the car now is 100% genuine, with authentic parts throughout, and will now accord with the warranty criteria.