The Stress Crack Myth

Bananas do not grow on trees.

Bats are not blind.

Duck quacks DO echo.

Bulls do not become angry at the color red.

Windscreens do not stress crack.

Bananas grow on something the size of trees, but the banana ‘tree’ is not actually a tree. The banana plant, which can grow up to 25 feet, is actually the world’s largest perennial herb. When you carefully inspect a banana plant, you’ll notice that it doesn’t have woody fibers. It has strong stalks and leaves, yet it lacks the trunk and branches that would qualify it as a tree.

Bats see in black and white. At night they see better than we do. They lack color receptors; but in low light, we can’t see colors either.

Duck quacks have no special sonic quality to prevent echoing.

Bulls and other cattle are partially color-blind; they cannot see the color red. They are, however, defensive creatures and will charge when threatened, frightened or annoyed.

Education is the debunking of mis-education. This includes spotting and correcting the many myths emanating from the internet, folk wisdom and word of mouth. We have all been taken in, at some point or another, by a modern myth. The countless ‘stress cracked’ windscreens returned to wholesalers as defects are, 99.9% of the time, rocking horse shit. There is usually an explanation.

Windscreens do not crack spontaneously. This cited phenomenon is usually attributed to bad or incorrect fitting. In some instances the crack will be emanating from an impact, and in some rare cases extreme thermal fluctuations can be a cause. The study of fracture mechanics does not accommodate for laminated windscreens which have, “cracked for no reason”.

Stress-cracked windscreens: a trade fallacy.

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