Windscreen Condensation.

Have you noticed that your windscreen is fogging up more than it used to? It may just be something unavoidable, or it could be something much worse.

First and foremost, water vapour in the atmosphere which occurs when your body heats the air inside the car – as does your breath – increases the amount of moisture it can hold. This means when it comes into contact with your windscreen (or glass) it cools and condenses, forming a mist. Simple. Nothing to worry about; it’s science at work. There are several tips (or hacks as they’re commonly referred to on social media) on how to prevent this such as:

  • Use the heater efficiently. Start the heater off cold, then slowly increase the temperature as the air dries out, rather than overloading the cabin with hot, ‘wet’ air.
  • Open one of the windows as you wait for the condensation to clear. The idea is that you’re not raising the temperature inside the cabin which will slow the process [of clearing] down.
  • Coat the inside of the glass with a recognised water repellent which will help prevent condensation.
  • Keep the windows clean. Keeping your windscreen clean will go a long way to stopping it misting up in the first place.

If you still experience excessive condensation, you could be looking at a much bigger problem.

It is still worthwhile noting that glass will mist up more in cold or wet weather. During the colder months the car windows might take slightly longer to clear; even longer so if it’s raining. However if you find that the windows continue to mist up to the point that the water droplets become bigger and more visible, the car is battling a water problem.

Where is the water coming from?

If you’re not bringing the water in on your clothes, or have left a door, tailgate or window open to allow the carpet to soak up rain, something could be leaking. The most obvious culprit usually is the windscreen. Next in line could be the sunroof (if the car has one) or the sunroof drainage; next in line: doors (drainage in the door) or the door membrane (between the door card and door. Some cars will develop a heater matrix leak and is much harder to detect.

Whatever the cause is, get it looked at as a matter of urgency. Driving a car with windows misting up is dangerous as well as illegal. You might argue the fine or even pay it if you’re happy to throw up to £1,000.00 down the drain, but crashing the car will cost you much more. Injuring or killing someone (because you didn’t see them in time) is unforgivable and it is not something most people can live with.

Always clear all windows before setting off.

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